Revolution & Cinema · Spring Seminar 2020

 
Initially planned for May, the Spring Seminar 2020 took place in the fall, via Zoom.
 
Spring Seminar 2020
Revolution & Cinema
October 15-16th 2020
 
 
Confirmed speakers & artists:
 
Ângela Ferreira
Ros Gray
Maria do Carmo Piçarra
Isabel Capeloa Gil
June Givanni
Billy Woodberry
 
 
The fields of cinema and contemporary visual arts have been positioned, in recent years, from the perspective of recovering a historical memory of the colonized peoples. This recovery has been made either by the use of images or by the recovery of films produced by native filmmakers and artists (recovered from the archives), allowing the uncovering of their own imaginary, much built from the revolutions after the departure of the western countries.
 
The academy itself has produced a series of books and texts that aim to document and think these archives, as well as these national cinemas and artistic objects, giving them a place of visibility, contradicting established canons of cinema and its western worldview. At the Spring Seminar, Professor Ros Gray's book Cinemas of the Mozambican Revolution will be launched, which traces a history of the INC (Mozambican film institute) and the cinema made by Mozambican militant filmmakers.
 
In this seminar, we intend to discuss this recovery, either from this silenced history of a national cinema and/or art of the colonized peoples, or from Western artists and filmmakers who work on this legacy from a postcolonial perspective.

Papers discussing the following topics will be accepted:

  • Postcolonial legacy in film and visual Arts
  • Decolonization movements and their relationship with cinema and the visual arts
  • The third cinema
  • Decolonization of film and art histories
  • Collective forms of film and artistic production
  • The role of political cinema
  • Activist art or the relationship of art to politics
  • Other ways of thinking about cinema as a revolutionary artistic form
Organizing Committee
 
Scientific Committee
Maria Coutinho (UCP / EA-CITAR)
Pedro Alves (UCP / EA-CITAR)
Paulo Cunha (UBI / LabCom)
Sérgio Dias Branco (UC / CEIS20)
Elisabete Marques (UP / ILML)
Tiago Baptista (IHC-NOVA)
Ana Balona de Oliveira (NOVA / IHA)
Carlos Natálio (NOVA / ICNOVA)

 


 
KEYNOTE SPEAKERS AND ARTISTS
 
Ângela Ferreira
 
Abstract
The presentation will focus on the component of the artist's practice that is concerned with the development of metaphors and political comments based on critical investigations around films. Projects such as Hotel da Praia Grande (The State of Things), 2003, For Mozambique, 2008, Political Cameras (from the Mozambique series) 2011, Studies for Jean Rouch Monument in Mozambique 2011, SAAL Brigades, 2014, One Million Roses for Angela Davis, 2020, will serve as a starting point for reflecting on the evocative image of the idea of revolution in various contexts: the political utopias, the creative energy of the Portuguese revolution, the political and social enthusiasm of post-independence in Africa, and decoloniality.
 
Biography
Ângela Ferreira (Maputo, 1958), grew up in South Africa and obtained her MFA from the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. She lives and works in Lisbon, teaching Fine Arts at Lisbon University, where she obtained her PhD in 2016. Ferreira’s work is concerned with the ongoing impact of colonialism and post-colonialism on contemporary society, an investigation that is conducted throught in-depth research and distillation of ideias into concise and resonant forms.
 
She represented Portugal at the 52nd Venice Biennale in 2007, continuing her investigations into the ways in which European modernism to adapted or failed to adapt to the realities of the African continent by tracing the history of Jean Prouvé’s’ Maison Tropicale’. Architecture also serves as a starting point for the deepening of her long research on the erasure of colonial memory and the refusal of reparation, which finds its most complex materialization in A Tendency to Forget (2015) focusing on ethnographic work of the couple Jorge and Margot Dias. Her sculptural, sound and videographic homages have continuously referenced economic, political and cultural history of the African continent.
 
Selected works: Dalaba: Sol d’Exile (2019); Pan African Unity Mural (2018); Remining (2017); Talk Tower for Diego Rivera (2017); Boca (2016); Wattle and Daub (2016); Hollows Tunnels, Cavities and more... (2016); A Tendency to Forget (2015); Wild Decolonization (2015); Messy Colonialism (2015); Revolutionary Traces (2014); SAAL Brigades (2014); Independance Cha Cha (2014); Entrer dans la mine (2013); Mount Mabu (2013); Stone Free (2012); Political Cameras (from Mozambique series) (2012); Collapsing Structures/ Talking Buildings (2012); Cape Sonnets (2010/2012); For Mozambique (2008).
 
 
 
Ros Gray

Abstract

In one of the first cultural acts to follow independence in 1975, FRELIMO's new socialist government of Mozambique set up a National Institute of Cinema (the INC). In a country where many people had little previous experience of cinema, the INC was tasked to "deliver to the people an image of the people". This book explores how this unique culture of revolutionary filmmaking began during the armed struggle against Portuguese colonialism. Following independence, the INC began the task of decolonising the film industry, building on networks of solidarity with other socialist and non-aligned struggles. Mozambique became an epicentre for militant filmmakers from around the world and cinema played an essential role in building the new nation. Crucially, the book examines how filmmaking became a resource for resistance against Apartheid as the Cold War played out across Southern Africa during the late 1970s and 1980s. Drawing on detailed film analysis, production histories and testimonies of key participants, Cinemas of the Mozambican Revolution provides a compelling account of this radical experiment in harnessing cinema to social change. 
 
In her session, Ros Gray will be presenting Cinemas of the Mozambican Revolution: Anti-Colonialism, Independence and Internationalism in Filmmaking, 1968-1991the book in which she analyzes cinema during the Mozambican Revolution, in a pre-history of contemporary debates on decolonization, political practices of the moving image and artistic involvement with anti-colonial archives. 
 
 
Biography
Ros Gray is a Senior Lecturer in Fine Arts, Critical Studies in the Art Department at Goldsmiths. 
Her research currently has two main trajectories. The first explores networks, aesthetics and impact of militant filmmaking, particularly in relation to liberation struggles and revolutionary movements in Mozambique, Angola, Portugal, Guinea-Bissau and Burkina Faso. This research informs her forthcoming monograph Cinemas of the Mozambican Revolution: Anti-Colonialism, Independence and Internationalism in Filmmaking, 1968–1991 (James Currey, 2020).  The second focuses on artistic interventions in the fields of soil care, cultivation and decolonial ecologies more broadly.
 
Ros Gray is the author of numerous articles in journals including ARTMargins, The Journal of Visual Cultures, The Journal of African Cinemas and Textile: Journal of Cloth and Culture and has contributed to books such as Postcommunist Film: Russian, Eastern European and World Culture; The Encyclopedia of Postcolonial Studies; Renée Green, Endless Dreams and Time-Based Streams and a three volume book published in Portuguese on the history of filmmaking in Angola, Angola – O Nascimento de uma Nação. Gray was co-editor with Kodwo Eshun of a special issue of Third Text entitled “The Militant Image: A Ciné-Geography,” and co-curated a number of related film programmes at Iniva in London and at Musée Quai de Branly in Paris.
 
 
 
Maria do Carmo Piçarra

Abstract
Decolonization and political awareness through the poetic gaze of Sarah Maldoror
This presentation seeks to analyze the case of a unique director, Sarah Maldoror, and her work spanning from Europe to Africa and it details her special approach to political cinema of the internationalist movement. Maldoror gained renown for not using more traditional documentary approaches and the direct cinema technique, typical of internationalist-engaged cinema, in favour of a signature poetic, aesthetic gaze. Her political work, while still focusing on the challenges of the daily anti-colonial struggle, places unique characters and their psychological challenges at the core of the action. Her work was inspired by texts by Luandino Vieira, which she adapted to film, and by her experience in the war in Guinea-Bissau. Sarah was the only among the engaged filmmakers to use fiction to depict the anti-colonial war in the former Portuguese colonies. The films she directed in Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau after the countries’ independence have remained invisible. The fact that her films are almost invisible, and that the ones she made in Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau after the independence are rather unknown, makes it evident the lack of acknowledgement given to Maldoror in terms of film history and film studies. This silence is both due to the difficult balance between subjective drive and the objective coercion, which affected the work of this director, as well as to the condition of woman and director who showed African women’s political awareness and their role in the new African nations.
 
 
Biography
Maria do Carmo Piçarra holds a PhD and a master's degree in Communication Sciences from FCSH-UNL, and has done post-doctoral research (2015-2018) in Communication Sciences at CECS-U. Minho and in CFAC-U. Reading.
She was assistant chairman of the Portuguese Institute of Cinema, Audiovisual and Multimedia (1998-1999), founder and co-editor (2012-2018) of ANIKI - Portuguese Journal of Moving Image and is a film critic and programmer.
 
Maria do Carmo Piçarra has published, among other titles and articles, “Overseas Blues. Colonial Propaganda and Censorship in the Estado Novo Cinema (2015), “Salazar goes to the movies I and II” (2006, 2011), and coordinated, with Jorge António, a trilogy Angola, “The Birth of a Nation” (2013, 2014 , 2015) and, with Teresa Castro, “(Re) Imagining African Independence. Cinema, Visual Arts and the Fall of the Portuguese Empire ”(2017).
 
 
 
Isabel Capeloa Gil
 
Isabel Capeloa Gil (Mira, 1965) is the Rector of the Catholic University of Portugal and a Full Professor of Culture Studies at the School of Human Sciences.She studied in Lisbon (University of Lisbon), Munich (Ludwig Maximilian University) and University of Chicago and holds a PhD in German Studies from UCP. 
 
Isabel Capeloa Gil has a special interest in researching issues of diversity and conflict and has structured her work around the exploration of the disciplinary boundaries between literature, the arts and other disciplines. 
 
She was a founding member and is a senior researcher at the Research Centre for Communication and Culture (CECC), where she coordinates the research group Culture, Art and Conflict (CAC). As an international scholar, Prof. Gil has held numerous visiting professorships at prestigious universities such as LMU University, Munich, Hamburg University, Ca’Foscari University, Venice, the Houston School of Film at the National University of Ireland, PUC Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), and USJ (Macao). She was a Visiting Fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg (Berlin) and Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (U. Stanford). Amongst her honours are a Fulbright Fellowship, and DAAD, FLAD and Gulbenkian Scholarships.
 
Isabel Capeloa Gil has been a regular consultant for research foundations such as the Danish Research Council, FAPESP (Brazil), the FCT and FLAD in Portugal as well as the Luso-American Commission (Fulbright). She was an evaluator of the prestigious Excellence Initiative of the German Federal Government and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and is Chair of the Humanities panel at the Danish Research Council. Furthermore, is the Honorary Fellow at the IGRS, School of Advanced Studies, University of London. In 2018, she became Chair of the Research Leadership Forum of the Global Federation of Competitiveness Councils.
 
 
 
June Givanni
 
Abstract
Revolution and Decolonisation: Narratives from the June Givanni Pan African Cinema Archive “We Revolt simply because for many reasons we can no longer breathe”, Frantz Fanon. Revolution and cinema, Pan African cinema, Third Cinema, all embrace ideas and philosophies around Decolonisation to permit freedom of thought and of action in a new postcolonial direction. The latter is a fundamental canon by the Martiniquan philosopher and psychiatrist Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) that links all of the above and as such Is one of the key overarching narratives in the JGPACA. These three narratives interconnect, are interdependent and are demonstrated in the field of African and African diaspora cinema – including Black British Cinema, Caribbean Cinema and African American Cinema.
 
Biography
June Givanni is a Guyanese-born London-based film curator. She has specialized in African-related movies since 1985.
She is a pioneering international film curator and is regarded as a resource for African and African diaspora cinema. She runs the June Givanni Pan African Cinema Archive (JGPACA) in London, a personal collection of films, ephemera, manuscripts, publications, audio, photography, posters documenting pan-African cinema, whose motivation  is to make this valuable heritage collection as widely accessible as possible.
 
She was co-ordinator of the Greater London Council's Third Eye Film Festival in 1983, and during the 1980s was active in working for the creation of specialist distribution circuits for the work of black and Third World filmmakers. At the British Film Institute she created and was responsible for managing the African Caribbean Unit, and she compiled the first comprehensive directory of black and Asian films in the UK, as well as starting the BFI's Black Film Bulletin (1993–96). She has worked with various international film festivals programming African and African diaspora films as a guest curator.
 
Her publications include the edited volumes Remote Control: Dilemmas of Black Intervention in British Film and TV (1996) and Symbolic Narratives/African Cinema: Audiences, Theory and the Moving Image (2001).
 
 
 
Billy Woodberry
 
Billy Woodberry is one of the leading members of the L.A. Rebellion, a film movement of the new generation of young African and African-American filmmakers who studied at the UCLA Film School in the late-1960s to the late-1980s and have created a quality Black Cinema that provided an alternative to the classical forms of Hollywood cinema, influenced by Italian neo-realism and the work of Third Cinema filmmakers. He is best known for directing the 1984 feature film, Bless Their Little Hearts (1984), which was honored at the Berlin International Film Festival. In Story of Africa, a 2015 single-channel video installation, 32 min he has enlivened a rarely seen photographic archive through the tragic tale of Calipalula, the Cuamato nobleman essential to the unfolding of events in a Portuguese "pacification campaign" of effective occupation of the territory, following the 1884–85 Berlin Conference resolution on the partition of Africa.
 

 


 

PROGRAM
 
  15th October 16th October
10h00

Conference Opening
Nuno Crespo, Daniel Ribas and João Pedro Amorim

 
10h00-11h30
Panel #1
Chair: João Pedro Amorim
Panel #3
Chair: Daniel Ribas
11h45-13h15
Panel #2
Chair: João Pedro Amorim
Panel #4
Chair: João Pedro Amorim
 
14h15-15h15
Keynote Speaker
Maria do Carmo Piçarra
Chair: Daniel Ribas
Artist Talk
June Givanni
Chair: João Pedro Amorim
15h15-16h15
Artist Talk
Ângela Ferreira
Chair: Nuno Crespo
Artist Talk 
Billy Woodberry
Chair: Daniel Ribas
16h15-16h30 PAUSA PAUSA
16h30-17h30
Book Event
Ros Gray
Keynote Speaker
Isabel Capeloa Gil
Chair: Nuno Crespo
17h30-18h30

Exhibition Opening*
Vasco Araújo · Pathosformel
Only taking place in site

18h30  Screening of Pathosformel*
+ talk with the artist
*Only taking place in site
 
 
October 15, Thursday

10h00 · Conference Opening
Nuno Crespo, Daniel Ribas, and João Pedro Amorim
 
10h15-11h30 · Panel #1 · Decolonial struggles · Chair: Daniel Ribas
 
Raquel Schefer · University of Lisbon / University of the Western Cape / Sorbonne Nouvelle — Paris 3
A Comparative Study of the Cinema of Liberation in Angola and Mozambique
 
Maja Figge · University of the Arts Berlin
A break from the “prison of appearances“? Aesthetics of decolonisation in Sarah Maldoror’s “Sambizanga”
 
Riccardo Uras · Università di Bologna
Postcolonial Ethiopian Cinema: Italian Colonialism, History and Memory in “Adwa: An African History” and
“Blood is Not Fresh Water”
 
João Oliveira Duarte · Universidade Nova de Lisboa
A Estranheza Daquilo que Fomos: “Facing Forward” de Fiona Tan
 
11h45-13h15 · Panel #2 · Liminarida-Decolonial · Chair: João Pedro Amorim
 
Michelle Sales, André Feitosa · Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro / Universidade de Coimbra
“Nossos fantasmas estão vindo cobrar”: problematizações decoloniais nas artes visuais
 
Edicleison Freitas · Universidade de Coimbra
“Ritual Vindication”: problematizações decoloniais no teatro experimental
 
Berta Ponte · Universidade de Évora
Monstro dos Sentires: problematizações decoloniais na literatura Roseana
 
 
14h15-15h15 · Keynote Speaker · Chair: Daniel Ribas
Maria do Carmo Piçarra
Decolonization and political awareness through the poetic gaze of Sarah Maldoror

15h15-16h15 · Artist Talk · Chair: Nuno Crespo
Ângela Ferreira
 
16h30-17h30 · Book Event
Ros Gray
Cinemas of the Mozambican Revolution: Anti-Colonialism, Independence
and Internationalism in Filmmaking, 1968-1991
 

October 16, Friday

10h00 · Panel #3 · Other struggles · Chair: Daniel Ribas

Sima Kokotovic · Concordia University
“Tactics of Forgetting, Strategies of Remembering”: Struggles, Legacies and the Subversive Film Festival
 
Igor Ramos, Helena Barbosa · Universidade de Aveiro
Revolução em curso: o cartaz de cinema português na década de 1970
 
Matthew Mason · Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Spectres of (Post)Marxism? ‘Cultural Revolution’ and the Sino-Soviet Split as Entertainment in Jean-Luc
Godard’s “La Chinoise” (1967)
 
Robert G. White
From an Image of Resistance to the Resistance of Image: Revolution, resistance and the archive in Post-Palestinian Cinema
 
11h45-13h15 · Panel #4 · Latin-American struggles · Chair: João Pedro Amorim
 
Patrícia Marcondes de Barros · Universidade Estadual de Londrina
“Hitler do III Mundo”: Fragmentos do Brasil no Período de Repressão Militar por José Agrippino de Paula e
Silva
 
Eduardo Prado Cardoso · Universidade Católica Portuguesa
Rasgar o tempo: crime, história e oralidade em Malunguinho
 
Aldones Nino · Universidade de Granada / Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
A insurreição na tela: as suturas entre a pintura de Marcela Cantuária e o cine-documentário latino americano
 
Deisimer Gorczevski · Universidade Federal do Ceará
Cinema In(ter)venção e Micropolíticas Urbanas
 
14h15-15h15 · Artist Talk · Chair: João Pedro Amorim
June Givanni
 
15h15-16h15 · Artist Talk · Chair: Daniel Ribas
Billy Woodberry
 
16h30-17h30 · Keynote Speaker · Chair: Nuno Crespo
Isabel Capeloa Gil
Crocodiles and love letters
 
17h30 · Exhibition Opening
Vasco Araújo · Pathosformel
 
18h30 · Screening of Pathosformel
+ talk with the artist
Abstracts
Panels
 
Sima Kokotic
“Tactics of Forgetting, Strategies of Remembering”: Struggles, Legacies and the Subversive Film Festival 
This paper explores the role global histories of political cinema can have for contemporary political movements invested in countering implementation of neoliberal measures leading to further privatizations and dispossessions of common property resources. More specifically, I focus on the Subversive Film Festival, founded in Zagreb, Croatia in 2008, and its relationship with the new left in the post-Yugoslav space. This new left took shape through spontaneous uprisings across the region—student protests, mass demonstrations against corruption, and workers strikes and factory occupations, etc.—while cultural events, such as Subversive, played constitutive role for “re-legitimizing left discourse within the population at large” (Štiks 2015, 143). Since the inaugural year, each of the succeeding editions of Subversive has been dedicated to one theme–e.g. ‘Homage to 1968’, ‘China 1949-2009’, ‘Socialism’, ‘Decolonization’. Such focused film program foregrounded the historical experiences of anti-colonial and anti-capitalist struggles through revitalization of distinct traditions of political cinema across the globe. The film screenings have been complemented with critical interrogations of those experiences, as the organizers invited prominent critical theorists to give talks and participate in panels as part of the festival. Figures such as Gayatri Spivak, Samir Amin, Antonio Negri, Tariq Ali, David Harvey, and many others attended the festival. Soon, Subversive also expanded to include an activist forum gathering many leftist political actors from the region to exchange their experiences and discuss directions for further struggles. Through the analysis of the festival’s print materials (festival catalogue and the accompanying critical theory reader “Up and Underground”) and its programming conception, I explore how political imaginaries embodied in global histories of political cinema offered to the activists of post-Yugoslav’s new left a repository for projecting an alternative political horizon while resisting the hegemony of neoliberalism.  
 
Sima Kokotović is a PhD student in Film and Moving Image Studies at Concordia University. His research project investigates three instances of contemporary radical film cultures, situated in three different geographies and three different political contexts, with the intention to understand how they responded to renewed impulses of struggle and resistance emerging across the globe in the last decade. He organized “Cinema in the Midst of Struggle,” a series of academic and non-academic events focused on political cinema in the neoliberal age, as well as “Politics of Alternative Media,” a project aimed at fostering the exchange of ideas about grassroots, non-commercial and emancipatory practices using media as instruments of mobilization, empowerment, and community building. 
 
***
 
Raquel Schefer
A Comparative Study of the Cinema of Liberation in Angola and Mozambique
Following a transnational and comparative approach, beyond the national film canon, this paper provides a comparative study of the Cinema of Liberation in Angola and Mozambique and establishes aesthetic, political, historical and epistemological parallels between Angolan and Mozambican revolutionary cinemas. Angolan and Mozambican revolutionary cinemas share a common historico-political and aesthetico-formal ground. Both emerge as “pre-cinemas” before the independence in the context of the Liberation Wars of Angola and Mozambique. In the two cases, foreign filmmakers, such as Sarah Maldoror and Santiago Álvarez, and internationalism play an important role in the process of formation of revolutionary film language. Angolan and Mozambican revolutionary cinemas not only reflect social transformation but also contribute to it, profoundly affecting the process of formation of national culture and imaginary. The foundation of the Mozambican National Institute of Cinema in 1976 and the Angolan Institute of Cinema in 1977 opens a period of development of non-hegemonic film language—through procedures such as archival appropriation and migration, along with strategies of carnivalisation—in the frame of the national cultural programmes. This paper provides an archaeological and critical reading of the Angolan and Mozambican cultural programmes. It focuses on the tensions between modernism and primitivism, representation, co-representation and self-representation through the analysis of Ruy Guerra’s Mueda, Memória e Massacre (Mozambique, 1979/1980), and Ruy Duarte de Carvalho’s Nelisita (Angola, 1982). The material history and the production conditions of these two films announce a parallel process of aesthetic canonisation—the formation of a socialist realist film canon—, and automatisation of the State. This paper seeks to scrutinise the history and aesthetics of the Cinema of Liberation in Angola and Mozambique through an interdisciplinary approach to provide a more complex and enriched genealogy of these filmographies.
 
Raquel Schefer is a researcher, a filmmaker, a film curator, and a lecturer at Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 University. She holds a Ph.D. in Film and Audiovisual Studies from Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3 University, with a dissertation on Mozambican revolutionary cinema, a Master in Documentary Cinema from the University of Cinema of Buenos Aires, and a degree in Communication Sciences from the New University of Lisbon. She published the book Self-Portrait in Documentary in 2008, in Argentina, as well as several book chapters and articles. She has taught at Grenoble Alpes University, Paris Est University, Rennes 2 University, the University of Cinema of Buenos Aires, and the University of Communication in Mexico City. She was a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, Los Angeles. Currently, she is a post-doctoral FCT fellow at the CEC/University of Lisbon and the University of the Western Cape, and a co-editor of the quarterly of theory and history of cinema La Furia Umana.
 
***
 
Maja Figge 
A break from the „prison of appearances“? Aesthetics of decolonisation in Sarah Maldoror’s Sambizanga 
The contemporary artistic and academic interest in the archive of Third or anti-colonial cinemas is the starting point for this inquiry into some of the aesthetic consequences of Frantz Fanon’s theory of decolonisation. Often times a relation to or with the archive of the transnational movement of Third Cinema is established in these debates with regard to its echo in contemporary political cinema and its new formats and its afterlife or even recurring circulation as „poor images“ (Steyerl 2009) in digital platforms. One example of working with the archive to evoke an actualization of the urgency of the decolonization moment is Hugo Göran Olsson’s film Concerning Violence (SE 2014), in which film material recorded in the 1960s and 1970s in solidarity with national liberation movements is combined with excerpts of Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth (1961). However the narrative closure Olsson produces, led me to Sarah Maldoror’s first feature Sambizanga (F/CG 1972) which resonates deeply with Fanon’s thinking, but – despite being criticized as being to conventional or beautiful – also fundamentally links the image movements of cinema with the actions of political movements as well as with their theoretical foundations. Sambizanga was made to raise awareness internationally about the wars of Independence in Lusophone Africa. Set in 1960, the film tells – based on a short story by Luandino Vieira – a story of the formation of the Angolan liberation movement (MPLA) through the lense of a woman’s search for her husband who is imprisoned and later tortured to death. By way of analyzing the intertwining of temporality and visibility in Sambizanga – with reference to the writings of Fanon, Achille Mbembe and Kara Keeling, the paper considers the political conditions of an film aesthetic break from the „prison of appearances“ (Achille Mbembe). 
 
Maja Figge is postdoctoral fellow with the Research Training Group “The Knowledge in the Arts” at University of the Arts Berlin. She is the author of Deutschsein (wieder-)herstellen. Weißsein und Männlichkeit im bundesdeutschen Kino der fuenfziger Jahre (2015) as well several edited volumes and numerous articles. Her current work focuses on the aesthetics and politics of anti- and post- and decolonial (post-)cinemas, temporality and memory politics, critical race theory and the history of film theory. She is working on a monograph entitled Entangled modernisms: transnational film relations between Western Europe and post-Independence India and the emergence of modern cinema. 
 
***
 
Patrícia Marcondes de Barros
“Hitler Do Iii Mundo”: Fragmentos Do Brasil No Período De Repressão Militar Por José Agrippino De Paula E Silva
O presente trabalho tem o objetivo de abordar o filme Hitler do III Mundo (1968) do artista paulista José Agrippino de Paula e Silva (1937-2007). Em face das estéticas artísticas tradicionais, a referida obra, sob a égide do movimento contracultural que eclodiu no mundo, representou uma ruptura, fundindo a realidade ao insólito com um realismo fantástico na apresentação alegórica do Brasil e de seus sujeitos incautos - marcado por seus ditadores aos representantes da esquerda ortodoxa na década de 60. Nessa perspectiva a obra entrecruza estética pop, literatura beat, contracultura, surrealismo, entre outros horizontes descortinados no experimentalismo do Tropicalismo, legando ao autor a ser uma das principais referências contraculturais no Brasil. A obra Hitler do III Mundo é seu único longa-metragem em 35mm, realizado com recursos limitados e filmado entre os anos de 1968 e 1969, período ápice da repressão militar no Brasil com o AI-5. As obras de Agrippino se dão em diferentes linguagens artísticas (cinema, teatro, literatura, entre outras) estabelecendo entre si uma complexa dialogia que propiciou uma ruptura aos padrões artísticos tanto na forma como no conteúdo, tornando-a marginal à época e alcançando o século XXI ainda como inovadora e fundadora de uma nova sensibilidade estética. O filme Hitler do III Mundo ficou duas décadas no anonimato, sendo divulgada no Brasil apenas em circuitos restritos no período de abertura política na década de 1980. O teor da obra reside na crise da identidade do indivíduo, num momento de torpor advindo do contexto histórico em que foi construída, centralizadas na figura de um ditador que resolve instaurar o fascismo no III Mundo e em uma esquerda representada por heróis com finais trágicos. Inicialmente trataremos do tema, desenvolvendo a análise da obra e suas confluências com o contexto histórico balizado pela ditadura militar, contracultura e tropicalismo. Posteriormente, alcançaremos suas principais referências artísticas na composição da referida obra que desvelou o Brasil em fragmentos disformes e grotescos, o cinema de invenção e transgressão, como postulou o crítico brasileiro Jairo Ferreira (1945-2003).
 
Patrícia Marcondes de Barros, Mestre e Doutora em História (UNESP-Assis), pós-doutora pelo Programa Nacional de Pós-Doutorado (PNPD/CAPES) em Literatura, Tradução e Cultura (UFPEL, 2018-2019) e Estudos Literários (UFU, 2019-2020). Autora do livro “Panis et Circenses”: A ideia de nacionalidade no Movimento Tropicalista (EDUEL, 2000). Organizadora das obras “Sol da Liberdade” (Editora Vieira & Lent, 2014) do escritor e filósofo Luiz Carlos Maciel e “A Contracultura na América do Sol”: Literatura e Resistências (no prelo, 2020). Professora na Universidade Estadual de Londrina, no Departamento de História. Seus trabalhos atuais abrangem as áreas da Literatura Marginal na década de 1970 e do Ensino de História e Linguagens.
 
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Matthew Mason
Spectres of (Post)Marxism? ‘Cultural Revolution’ and the Sino-Soviet Split as Entertainment in Jean-Luc Godard’s La Chinoise (1967)
This paper seeks to draw on scholarship which acknowledges the ability of film to capture and/or articulate a particular historical or theoretical ‘moment’ (Shapiro, 2020) as well as its unrivalled capacity to effectively represent ‘geopolitics’ for a popular, mass audience (Dodds, 2007). It will be suggested that Jean-Luc Godard’s 1967 film, La Chinoise, compellingly (if comically) captures the evolution of Marxist theory in the West as well as its ostensible practice in the East through its fascination with, and treatment of, the ‘Cultural Revolution’ (1966-1976) in Maoist China and through its provocative posing of grand theoretical questions (on utopia, on violence, on human agency) through radical cinematic techniques involving a subversive use of language, colour and sound. In short, while the film draws on the revolutionary events in China (as entertainment!), in so doing, it also problematises the notion of what constitutes a revolutionary cinema, and, at least in retrospect, appears to harbour a somewhat difficult and complex view of ‘revolution’ as at once a fundamental and farcical act. Godard’s subsequent disavowal of all his previous work and his attempt to produce a genuinely ‘revolutionary’ cinema from 1968 onwards sheds even more light on La Chinoise’s complex account of ‘cultural revolution’. I suppose that behind Godard’s uneasy, complex view of the ‘Cultural Revolution’ lies the historical shifts in theorizations of Marxism itself, both in the West (the emergence of the Frankfurt School, the critique of Stalin, Trotskyism, etc.) and in the East (the notion of the peasant rather than the worker as principal revolutionary agent) as well as attempting to capture culturally the material geopolitical tensions which had developed between China and the USSR at the time (with each nation claiming closer proximity to Marx’s original ideas!). In addition, Godard’s use of the ‘Cultural Revolution’ as the central theme in La Chinoise also points to the growing interest in the ‘Third World’ - or so-called Third-Worldism – which was gradually being exhibited by intellectuals in West at the time (e.g., Sartre, Foucault, Kristeva). Returning to Godard’s ‘long ‘67’ - and La Chinoise in particular -  then proves a fruitful object in which to analyse a critical historical and theoretical ‘moment’ in which the political theory of Marxism began to evolve/decompose in both theory and practice and on a global scale. 
 
Matthew Mason is a PhD Candidate in Culture Studies at the Lisbon Consortium. He received a BA in French and Italian from Manchester Metropolitan University and a MA in International Relations from the University of Kent in Brussels. His research revolves around the work and theory of the Situationist International, the films of Jean-Luc Godard and the political implications of postmodernism. He is also currently engaged in teaching English at Universidade Católica Portuguesa in Lisbon.
 
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Eduardo Prado Cardoso
Rasgar o tempo: crime, história e oralidade em Malunguinho (2013)
Esta comunicação pretende examinar os recursos formais e discursivos empregados por Felipe Peres Calheiros em seu filme de curta-metragem Malunguinho, lançado em 2013 no Festival do Rio. O documentário, rodado em Pernambuco, resgata o assassinato do líder quilombola Malunguinho, em 1835, de maneira a discutir sua importância, sentida ainda hoje em grupos que o cultuam no âmbito religioso. Através de uma reconstituição de época minimalista, em que o silêncio se impõe diante da natureza e dos atores caracterizados, o filme traz em voz over documentos históricos que sempre ditaram a versão oficial dos fatos. No entanto, quem narra é o cronista Miró da Muribeca, cujos poemas ao final do curta perturbam a verdade oferecida pelo Arquivo Público, e propõem um olhar crítico sobre a experiência negra no Brasil, seja no século XIX ou XXI. A maneira encontrada por Peres Calheiros para unir personagem histórico e entidade religiosa (funções exercidas pelo mesmo Malunguinho, com representações e recepções distintas) busca no ritual da Jurema em Recife, na batida do tambor, a presença de seu protagonista. De maneira pouco ortodoxa, uma vez que a historiografia brasileira parece perversamente unidimensional, Malunguinho recorre à música ritualística e à poesia negra para reposicionar o papel da oralidade na cultura brasileira. Como afirma Miró na abertura do filme: “Donos da escrita, os historiadores da elite, tentaram reduzir a trajetória do povo negro aos documentos policiais. Mas a oralidade rasgou o tempo, mesmo com todas as chacinas e perseguição da nossa religião.” Com uma proposta audiovisual que realça as novas possibilidades de leitura do arquivo, Malunguinho se destaca entre a produção brasileira recente, não somente pelo engajamento, mas pela originalidade estética com que apresenta seus temas. 
 
Eduardo Prado Cardoso é bacharel em Audiovisual pela ECA-USP, com especialização em Screenwriting pelo programa de mestrado Kino Eyes, das Universidades Lusófona, Edinburgh Napier University e Tallinn University. Atualmente, como doutorando em Estudos de Cultura na Universidade Católica Portuguesa, pesquisa representações de assassinatos reais no Brasil, em diferentes períodos e através de múltiplas plataformas. 
 
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Igor Ramos, Helena Barbosa
Revolução em curso: o cartaz de cinema português na década de 1970
A presente comunicação propõe-se a adoptar o cartaz de cinema como charneira para uma compreensão da realidade portuguesa – gráfica e cinematográfica –  através dos primeiros anos da década de 1970, PREC e período pós-Revolução. Partindo da observação de aproximadamente seis dezenas de cartazes pertencentes a filmes portugueses realizados entre 1970 e 1979, elegeram-se alguns deles como exemplos de diferentes traços e influências gráficas presentes neste artefacto, no decorrer do referido período temporal. Analisando a articulação que estabeleciam com os filmes que anunciavam (programa), os recursos com que eram concebidos, impressos e divulgados (tecnologia), a identidade e percurso dos designers que os desenharam e o argumento inerente ao design dos mesmos (autoria), pretende-se demonstrar que os cartazes de cinema, frequentemente negligenciados por historiadores e investigadores desta área, são na verdade artefactos que cristalizam no seu discurso gráfico diversos aspectos ligados não só à história do cinema, do design gráfico ou da cultura visual em Portugal, mas também à história do próprio país. Relativamente ao decénio de 1970, alguns dos principais destaques assentam na plasticidade e manualidade patentes na execução de certos cartazes pós-25 de Abril, onde se evidência ainda uma ‘contaminação’ estética dos cartazes de protesto; o trabalho de Carlos Alves, que assinou cartazes distintivos para as recém-formadas cooperativas de cinema Cinequanon e Cinequipa; o carácter acentuadamente moderno, influenciado pelo design gráfico suíço, de cartazes criados por designers como José Brandão (n. 1944) e Judite Cília (n. 1946), regressados a Portugal após a Revolução, vindos de Inglaterra e França, respectivamente; ou ainda por João da Câmara Leme (1930-1983), autor dos cartazes de Trás-os-Montes (1976) e Os Demónios de Alcácer-Quibir (1976).
 
Igor Ramos é aluno do Programa Doutoral em Design da Universidade de Aveiro, onde desenvolve uma investigação relacionada com a história e o design dos cartazes de cinema portugueses. Depois de estagiar no atelier Providênciadesign, tem trabalhado ao longo dos últimos quatro anos em diversos projetos de design para a área de cinema, colaborando com a Academia Portuguesa de Cinema, a distribuidora Nitrato Filmes, o Cinema Trindade do Porto, o Festival de Cinema Luso-Brasileiro de Santa Maria da Feira e a Revista Sábado. Em 2017 foi foi um dos primeiros recipientes do Prémio Nico, criado pela Academia Portuguesa de Cinema para distinguir profissionais emergentes no cinema português.
 
Helena Barbosa é professora de Design na Universidade de Aveiro, tendo como áreas de interesse a história do design, cultura material, museologia, museografia, ilustração e arte. Além da orientação de mestrados e doutoramentos, tem escrito e sido oradora convidada em conferências nacionais e internacionais, publicando livros e artigos em jornais e revistas científicas. Atualmente é Directora da Licenciatura em Design, Vice-directora do Programa Doutoral em Design da Universidade de Aveiro e da Unidade de Investigação ID+, e membro do board editorial de vários jornais internacionais. 
 
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Robert G. White
From an Image of Resistance to the Resistance of Image: Revolution, resistance and the archive in Post-Palestinian Cinema
At a time when politically it is increasingly impossible to imagine either the beginnings of a Palestinian State or the end of the status quo, this paper examines an emergent tendency in contemporary Palestinian filmmaking to imagine the political otherwise. Arguing against a stubborn tendency in existing scholarship in the area: to reductively homogenize Palestinian cinematic subjectivity into a singular ‘image of resistance’, this paper argues that the resistant politics of contemporary Palestinian cinema lies in rather in what I term a resistance of image. That is, a visual language that resists overdetermined signifiers of resistance associated with Palestine, and actively deconstructs the commodification of such images by both the Israeli State and the Palestinian Authority as empty signifiers of oppression and resistance.  The conceptual framework of this resistance of image draws on both a literary genealogy (Emile Habiby, Edward Said and Jean Genet) and on a cinematic genealogy (the PLO’s Palestine Film Unit and Jean-Luc Godard’s ‘resistant images’ of the Palestinian Revolution). It is this critical, questioning dialogue with the archive and the legacy of the PLO Film Unit’s revolutionary cinema which, this paper argues, rearticulates the question of how images can resist in a contemporary context. The paper concludes by examining an emergent ‘post’ Palestinian cinematic consciousness; not as a marker of periodization, but rather a call to imagine alternative futures foreclosed by the contemporary political impasse. This tendency will be explored through readings of the recent work of Kamal Aljafari, Larissa Sansour and Basma Alsharif. 
 
Robert G. White recently completed his PhD at the London Graduate School, a Critical Theory doctoral programme at Kingston University, London. His research explores the intersection of film and philosophy. His doctoral research utilized a topological approach to examine the dual questions of partition and the resistance of the image in contemporary Palestinian cinema. He has presented his research at international conferences and has been published in the peer-reviewed journal Film Criticism. He is the co-editor of Spaces of Crisis and Critique: Heterotopias Beyond Foucault (Bloomsbury, 2018).
 
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Aldones Nino 
A insurreição na tela: as suturas entre a pintura de Marcela Cantuária e o cine-documentário latino americano 
Em que medida seria possível estabelecer proximidades entre a produção cinematográfica e pictórica com a ação dos movimentos de descolonização? Visando lançar luz a está questão, esta comunicação tem como interesse abordar os entrelaçamentos entre a poética da pintora brasileira Marcela Cantuária e o cine-documentário latino americano. Em alguns de seus trabalhos, há uma constância da presença de still’s, legendas e narrativas filmográficas. Tendo como base a constituição de um arquivo de cenas de insurgências latino americanas, suas pinturas se voltam para os levantes políticos ocorridos na América Latina. Adotamos como ponto de partida, a série de trabalhos apresentados em duas exposições individuais da artista realizada em 2019, Sutur|ar Libert|ar (Centro Municipal de Arte Hélio Oiticica) e La larga noche de los 500 años (A Gentil Carioca), debateremos de que modo as  imagens e narrativas presentes em diversos filmes como, por exemplo, Maria Bonita, rainha do cangaço (1968) dirigido por Miguel Borges; e Las compañeras tienen grado (1995) de Guadalupe Miranda e María Inés Roqué; Guardiana de los ríos (2016) dirigido por Katia Lara, são elementos centrais para uma abordagem decolonial, assim instrumentalizando pictoricamente imagens/monumentos utópicos insurgentes que orienta uma recusa à narrativa oficial. Ao compor uma gramática transfronteiriça, Marcela questiona os legados coloniais, dando centralidade para as aproximações possíveis entre à história da degradação ambiental, da exploração do trabalho e do protagonismo feminino, estabelecendo reconexões entre fatores sociais apagados ou desconsiderados pela historiografia tradicional. Ao partir do cine-documentário latino americano e da tradição pictórica, Cantuária, posiciona-se frente a estes cânones, articulando uma poética da memória e manipulando signos como estratégia político/poética em prol da emancipação do imaginário, tensionando temas como cinema político, arte ativista e múltiplas relações entre arte e posicionamento decolonial.
 
Curador independente e historiador da arte. Bacharel em História da Arte pela Escola de Belas Artes - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (2019). Mestre em História, Política e Bens Culturais pelo Centro de Pesquisa e Documentação de História Contemporânea do Brasil - CPDOC (2018). Bacharel e Licenciado em Filosofia pela Universidade São Judas Tadeu, USJT - São Paulo (2013). Em 2019 foi curador das exposições: Sonantes no Centro Cultural Light, La larga noche de los 500 años, na galeria A Gentil Carioca, e Andando na história de meu povo na Galeria Gustavo Schnoor (UERJ). 
 
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Riccardo Uras
Postcolonial Ethiopian Cinema: Italian Colonialism, History and Memory in “Adwa: An African History” and “Blood is Not Fresh Water”
Italian colonialism in Africa has been a forgotten chapter of the recent Italian history for a long time. This process of collective suppression, not merely from the historical debate but from the political-media tout court, has prevented serious analysis on Italian colonial past and on the violence perpetrated against African populations during the period of occupation. This lack of reflection on the past has had repercussions on Italian cinema and on its ability to critically narrate this systematically overshadowed chapter of the country’s history. For both economic and political issues, such as the difficulties in deconstructing the “Italiani brava gente” (“Italians, the good people”) myth, contemporary Italian cinema has put little interest in the history of Italian colonialism in Africa. It is therefore interesting to turn our gaze to the other side of the Mediterranean, towards the countries that have suffered this domination for more than fifty years, looking for the reconstruction of an alternative historical narrative. Focusing on Ethiopian cinema, my research investigates the memory and perception of Ethiopian history and Italian colonialism from the point of view of two directors: Haile Gerima and his “Adwa: An African Victory” (1999) and Theo Eshetu with “Blood Is Not Fresh Water” (1997). Opposed to the eurocentrism of Western historiography and rejecting a stereotyped vision of Africa, these two documentary films manage to develop a new perspective, which serves as a counterpoint to the dominant historical narrative of a “colonialism with a human face”. In this way, Eshetu and Gerima try to recover their collective memory, suppressed by the colonizers and denied to the colonized, as descendants of the people who resisted against the Italian colonial invasion. 
 
Riccardo Uras was born in Cagliari on 25th October 1993. He received a bachelor’s degree in Foreign Languages and Cultural Mediation (Spanish and English) at the University of Cagliari in 2016. He is a second year Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology Master student at the Alma Mater Studiorum – University of Bologna. He is currently working on his master’s thesis: an ethnographic research about emigration, modernization processes and post-colonial relations in southwestern Sardinia. He is interested in migration patterns, post-colonial studies and Italian colonialism. 
 
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Deisimer Gorczevski
Cinema In(ter)venção e Micropolíticas Urbanas 
Como seria pensar o cinema e a cidade desde os bairros? Pensar o cinema e a cidade desde os vizinhos mais próximos, desde os afetos? Que cinema é esse que inventa e é inventado com as ruas, as praças e os monumentos públicos? Essa rede de questões apresenta algumas das inquietações que compõem a pesquisa Cinema In(ter)venção: Cine Ser Ver Luz, vinculada ao Laboratório Artes e Micropolíticas Urbanas – LAMUR, no Programa de Pós-Graduação em Artes, na Universidade Federal do Ceará, no nordeste do Brasil. A proposição de pesquisar a relação entre cinema e cidade emerge como um desdobramento das experiências com intervenções urbanas, iniciadas em pesquisas anteriores, que envolviam a área das artes em interface com as áreas de arquitetura e urbanismo, entre outras, onde alargamos as relações com diferentes processos de criação nos aproximando de coletivos e associações de moradores. A escolha da Cartografia e da Pesquisa-Intervenção como métodos de fazer-saber coletivo e transdisciplinar convidam à atitude de pesquisar com o bairro, com os moradores, com as associações, com o Cine Ser Ver Luz. O estudo acompanha as intervenções do Coletivo AudioVisual do Titanzinho –  Cineclube e as Mostras AudioVisuais – realizadas com as ruas, praças, praias e o Farol do Mucuripe, na perspectiva de dar continuidade às escutas e análises de como os moradores vivem, convivem e resistem ao descaso do poder público, às constantes ameaças das políticas de remoção e a intensificação da especulação imobiliária, na cidade de Fortaleza. O Cine Ser Ver Luz vem inventando um modo de fazer cinema com o bairro Serviluz muito próximo ao que entendemos por in(ter)venção, pensando nas práticas que buscam interferir no cotidiano das ruas, becos e praças – territórios geopolíticos e existenciais – e nas concepções institucionalizadas de cinema e audiovisual  – com o objetivo de perturbar seu desenvolvimento e, desse modo, reinventá-los. 
 
Pesquisadora, professora e, atualmente, coordenadora do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Artes, no Instituto de Cultura e Arte da Universidade Federal do Ceará, no nordeste do Brasil. Coordena o Laboratório Artes e Micropolíticas Urbanas – LAMUR, onde realiza as pesquisas Fortalezas Sensíveis e Cinema In(ter)venção: Cine Ser Ver Luz. Realizou doutorado em Ciências da Comunicação pela Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos e doutorado-sanduíche em Comunicação Audiovisual na Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Espanha. Entre as publicações mais recentes organizou os livros Cinema que Inventa o Bairro, Nossas Ruas com Cinema, ambos em coautoria e o livro Arte que Inventa Afetos.